Review: Predictors for severe COVID-19 infection

Home/Review: Predictors for severe COVID-19 infection

Review: Predictors for severe COVID-19 infection

Review: Predictors for severe COVID-19 infection

This retrospective chart review found that 1) acute/pre-existing renal disease; 2) oxygen requirement at the time of hospitalization; and 3) initial C-reactive protein were independent predictors for the development of severe COVID19 infections. 

  • A  single-center, retrospective observational study, which included patients with confirmed RT-PCR assay of a nasopharyngeal swab from March 8th to April 8th, 2020 were included
  • Severe COVID-19 infection was defined as a patient requiring mechanical ventilation
  • A total of 197 hospitalized patients, with mean (SD) age of the cohort was 60.6 (16.2) years. 103 (52.3%) were male and 156 (82.1%) were black
  • Most common underlying conditions: Hypertension, 138 (70.1%) patients; diabetes, 73 (37.1%);  and chronic pulmonary diseases in 38 (19.3%) patients.
  • 60 (31.6%) had a sick contact
  • Predictors for severe COVID-19
    • Pre-existing renal disease: OR 7.4 (95%CI: 2.5, 22.0)
    • Elevated creatinine from baseline: OR 2.7 (95%CI: 1.3, 5.6)
    • Oxygen requirement: OR 2.9 (95%CI: 1.3, 6.7)
    • Initial CRP value: OR 1.006 (95%CI: 1.001, 1.01)
  • Limitations: Some ambiguity on defining certain variables within multivariate model.
|2020-06-04T09:36:25-04:00June 2nd, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Megan McHenry

Megan McHenry
Megan S. McHenry, MD, MS, FAAP is a pediatrician and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Ryan White Center for Pediatric Infectious Disease and Global Health at Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. McHenry's research focuses on early childhood development in children living in resource-limited settings. This work is frequently aligned with community-engaged research and dissemination and implementation science frameworks. She primarily conducts research in collaboration with the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) Research Network in Kenya. Dr. McHenry currently has a career development award through the National Institutes of Health to develop a neurodevelopmental screening program for children born to HIV-infected mothers in Kenya. Dr. McHenry is also the Director of Pediatric Global Health Education and a co-Director of the Morris Green Physician-Scientist Development Program at Indiana University School of Medicine. In additional to global health lectures, she also educates residents and students on early childhood development, basic biostatistical techniques, research methodologies, and research ethics. She mentors multiple pediatric fellows, residents, and medical students interested in early childhood development within global contexts.

Get Involved with Indiana CTSI