Review: Saliva as an alternate specimen source for detection of SARS-CoV-2 in symptomatic patients using Cepheid Xpert Xpress SARS-CoV-2

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Review: Saliva as an alternate specimen source for detection of SARS-CoV-2 in symptomatic patients using Cepheid Xpert Xpress SARS-CoV-2

Review: Saliva as an alternate specimen source for detection of SARS-CoV-2 in symptomatic patients using Cepheid Xpert Xpress SARS-CoV-2

This study found that SARS-CoV-2 testing results via nasopharyngeal swab and saliva sample were comparable, and that saliva is an acceptable alternative source for detecting SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid.

  • Study used Cepheid Xpert Xpress SARS-CoV-2 (Sunnyvale, CA) PCR test for both samples
  • A total of 156 paired NPS and saliva specimens were tested, all symptomatic patients from hospital ED or inpatient service
  • The overall SAR-CoV-2 positivity was 50/156 (32.1%), while the community rate of positivity during the week of collection was 11.1%
  • 153/156 (98% [94.48 -99.60%, 95% Confidence Interval (CI)]) samples were in overall agreement.
  • 47/49 samples were positive in saliva when compared to the NPS resulting in a positive percent agreement of 96% (86.02 -99.5%, 95% CI).
  • A single sample demonstrated detectable levels of SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid in the saliva, but the NPS was negative (1/106) resulting in a negative percent agreement of 99% (94.86-99.98%, 95% CI)

 

|2020-05-19T11:54:38-04:00May 19th, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Megan McHenry

Megan McHenry
Megan S. McHenry, MD, MS, FAAP is a pediatrician and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Ryan White Center for Pediatric Infectious Disease and Global Health at Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. McHenry's research focuses on early childhood development in children living in resource-limited settings. This work is frequently aligned with community-engaged research and dissemination and implementation science frameworks. She primarily conducts research in collaboration with the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) Research Network in Kenya. Dr. McHenry currently has a career development award through the National Institutes of Health to develop a neurodevelopmental screening program for children born to HIV-infected mothers in Kenya. Dr. McHenry is also the Director of Pediatric Global Health Education and a co-Director of the Morris Green Physician-Scientist Development Program at Indiana University School of Medicine. In additional to global health lectures, she also educates residents and students on early childhood development, basic biostatistical techniques, research methodologies, and research ethics. She mentors multiple pediatric fellows, residents, and medical students interested in early childhood development within global contexts.

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