Review: The association between severe COVID-19 and low platelet count: Evidence from 31 observational studies involving 7613 participants

Home/Review: The association between severe COVID-19 and low platelet count: Evidence from 31 observational studies involving 7613 participants

Review: The association between severe COVID-19 and low platelet count: Evidence from 31 observational studies involving 7613 participants

Review: The association between severe COVID-19 and low platelet count: Evidence from 31 observational studies involving 7613 participants

This meta-analysis found that individuals with either severe cases or non-surviving cases of COVID-19 had lower platelet counts compared to individuals with non-severe and surviving cases, suggesting that thrombocytopenia may be a risk factor for COVID-19 progressing into a more severe state. 

  • From the search (including articles up to 30 April 2020), authors found 31 studies with 7613 participants.
  • For the 25 studies reported the platelet count of both severe and non-severe COVID-19 patients, the pooled SMD revealed a lower platelet count in severe patients than non-severe patients (SMD=-0.36, 95% CI: -0.48~-0.23, I^2=56.9%)
  • Six of the 25 studies defined death as the severe state. The pooled SMD revealed a much lower platelet count in non-survivor COVID-19 patients than survivor patients (SMD=-0.60, 95% CI: -0.72~-0.47, I^2<0.1%)
  • Of note, abnormal platelet counts, especially thrombocytopenia, are common in the ICU and usually indicate organ dysfunction that lead to a disorder of homeostasis. Thus, it may not be a specific indicator for COVID-19 itself, but rather, of the overall worsening clinical status of a patient.

 

 

|2020-05-22T11:00:16-04:00May 21st, 2020|COVID-19 Literature|0 Comments

About the Author: Megan McHenry

Megan McHenry
Megan S. McHenry, MD, MS, FAAP is a pediatrician and an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in the Ryan White Center for Pediatric Infectious Disease and Global Health at Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. McHenry's research focuses on early childhood development in children living in resource-limited settings. This work is frequently aligned with community-engaged research and dissemination and implementation science frameworks. She primarily conducts research in collaboration with the Academic Model for Providing Access to Healthcare (AMPATH) Research Network in Kenya. Dr. McHenry currently has a career development award through the National Institutes of Health to develop a neurodevelopmental screening program for children born to HIV-infected mothers in Kenya. Dr. McHenry is also the Director of Pediatric Global Health Education and a co-Director of the Morris Green Physician-Scientist Development Program at Indiana University School of Medicine. In additional to global health lectures, she also educates residents and students on early childhood development, basic biostatistical techniques, research methodologies, and research ethics. She mentors multiple pediatric fellows, residents, and medical students interested in early childhood development within global contexts.

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